Tag: Vanadium

How Was Vanadium Discovered?

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How Was Vanadium Discovered? Vanadium is a silvery-white transition metal with element symbol V, atomic number 23, and atomic weight 50.9414. Vanadium has a high melting point of 1890 ° C and is called refractory metal together with niobium, tantalum, tungsten, and molybdenum. Due to its excellent physical and chemical properties, vanadium and vanadium alloy are widely […]

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What Is The Most Refractory Metal In The World?

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What Is The Most Refractory Metal In The World? In the non-ferrous metal family, tungsten has maintained the title of “High-Temperature Champion” for hundreds of years. The first person in the world to discover tungsten was the Swedish chemist Seller. He first decomposed tungstic acid with acid in 1781 to obtain tungsten. Then, after a […]

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Why Is Vanadium A Transition Metal?

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Why Is Vanadium A Transition Metal? The melting point of vanadium is about 1000 degrees lower than that of columbium, so there is much less interest in vanadium for high-temperature applications than in the abundant refractory metals. Pure vanadium has only recently become available in quantities large enough for thorough studies of its physical and […]

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The List Of Abundant Refractory Metals

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The List Of Abundant Refractory Metals Tungsten, tantalum, molybdenum, columbium, vanadium, and chromium may be classed as relatively abundant refractory metals; that is, free world reserves of contained metal are over 100,000 tons for each metal. The first four show promise in a considerably higher temperature range than the last two, and sometimes the term […]

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How Refractory Metals were Discovered and Developed?

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How Refractory Metals were Discovered and Developed? In today’s article, we’ll take a look at how refractory metals were discovered and developed. Refractory metals are referred to elements or alloys with melting points over 3002℉, such as tungsten, molybdenum, tantalum, niobium, titanium, zirconium, hafnium, vanadium, chromium, rhenium and alloys including tungsten alloys, molybdenum alloys, niobium […]

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