Category: Niobium

Niobium has a melting point of 4474 F, which is 256 degrees lower than that of molybdenum. Pure niobium is very ductile and can be cold worked easily at room temperature. As with tantalum, large reductions are possible between anneals.

The density of niobium is only slightly greater than that of steel and considerably less than that of other refractory metals with higher melting points. Because of this, and the high-temperature strength and favorable nuclear properties, there has been extensive development of niobium base alloys for airborne nuclear reactors.

What Is Niobium Used For In Everyday Life?

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What is niobium used for in everyday life?  Niobium has a melting point of 4474 F, which is 256 degrees lower than that of molybdenum. The development of niobium metal and its alloys for elevated-temperature structural applications was started only a few years ago, but considerable progress has been made since then. One factor that has […]

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The Role of Niobium in Superalloys

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The Role of Niobium in Superalloys Refractory elements are important alloying additions in both nickel-base and iron-nickel-base superalloys. They are responsible for the increased high-temperature mechanical properties present in current superalloy systems. In this article, we’ll take a look at the role of niobium in superalloys. It has long been established that nickel-base and iron-nickel-base […]

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Niobium – A Material for Innovations with Great Future Potential

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Niobium – A Material for Innovations with Great Future Potential In this article, we will introduce niobium, a material for innovations with great future potential. In actual fact, niobium, like all other metals, is gray. However, by applying a passifying oxide layer, we allow our metal to gleam in a beautiful array of colors. Niobium is […]

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